How Native communities can access $31.2B American Rescue Plan, 3.15.21

FEDERAL PRESS RELEASE – SCHATZ RELEASES COVID-19 RELIEF GUIDE, FAQS TO HELP NATIVE COMMUNITIES ACCESS FEDERAL RESOURCES

At Least $31.2 Billion, Biggest One-Time Investment in U.S. History, Heading to Native Communities in American Rescue Plan; Resource Guide, FAQs on Historic $31.2 Billion for Native Communities

WASHINGTON – U.S. Senator Brian Schatz (D-Hawai‘i), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, released a comprehensive guide and a Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ) document to help Native communities navigate COVID-19 relief resources authorized by the American Rescue Plan Act.

“At least $31.2 billion in dedicated resources – the biggest one-time investment in U.S. history – is heading to Native communities. This funding will assist Native communities as they continue to tackle the impacts of COVID-19,” said Senator Schatz, a member of the Senate Appropriations Committee. “Our resource guide and FAQs will be updated as more information becomes available to ensure American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian communities have up-to-date information about the resources available to them.”

The comprehensive resource guide of the $31.2 billion available for Native communities: (https://www.indian.senate.gov/sites/default/files/2021-03-15%20Sec-by-Sec%20ARPA%20Tribal%20Funding%20%28SCIA%29.pdf)

March 15, 2021
American Rescue Plan Act
Budget Reconciliation Support for Tribes &
Native Communities
Overview: Support for Tribes & Native Communities in the American Rescue Plan Act
The American Rescue Plan Act is the single largest infusion of resources into Indian Country and Native communities in U.S. history
 Contains $32+ billion in targeted funding for Tribal governments and Native communities.
 Includes billions of dollars in additional funding that will benefit Native families and Tribes (e.g.,
individual economic impact payments, increased SNAP benefits, PPP, EIDL, etc.).
The American Rescue Plan Act contains historic “firsts”
 The first time Congress has ever provided dedicated, direct spending in a Budget Reconciliation package for the Indian Health Service (IHS), the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA), the Bureau of Indian Education (BIE), and the Administration for Native Americans (ANA).
 The first time Congress has provided Tribes direct, equal access to the Department of Treasury’s State Small Business Credit Initiative program as well as the first time Congress has provided Urban Indian Health Programs and Native Hawaiian Health Centers equal access to federal Medicaid reimbursement resources.
 The first COVID-19 relief package with dedicated resources to address the impacts of the pandemic on Native American languages and cultures. The American Rescue Plan Act respects Tribal sovereignty and self-determination
 Structures dedicated Tribal funding resources in response Tribal feedback on implementation barriers and inefficiencies for the FFCRA, CARES, the PPPHCE, and the CRRSA/Coronabus.
 Pushes funding through agencies with existing Indian Country footprints to expedite funding distribution.
 Cuts red tape so Tribes and Native communities don’t have to divert resources from their COVID19 response efforts just to navigate grant opportunities, file new applications, or comply with burdensome, duplicative reporting requirements.
 Provides Tribes and Native communities with greater flexibility on deciding how to deploy funds and meet their peoples’ needs.

Section-by-Section: Dedicated Support for
Tribes & Native Communities in the American Rescue Plan Act
TITLE I – COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE, NUTRITION, & FORESTRY ($20,200,000) SEC. 1006 – USDA ASSISTANCE AND SUPPORT FOR SOCIALLY DISADVANTAGED FARMERS, RANCHERS, FOREST LAND OWNERS AND OPERATORS, AND GROUPS ($20,200,000).
This section authorizes $20,200,000 in direct funding for the Department of Agriculture to support agricultural research, education, extension, scholarships, and internships at Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native serving institutions of higher education, and Native Hawaiian serving institutions of higher education. Section 1006 specifies that the Department must use:
 $10,100,000 for Tribal Colleges and Universities; and
 $10,100,000 for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian serving institutions of higher education. These funds will remain available until expended.
TITLE II – COMMITTEE ON HEALTH, EDUCATION, LABOR, & PENSIONS ($1,409,470,734)
SEC. 2003 – HIGHER EDUCATION EMERGENCY RELIEF FUND ($231,569,734)
In addition to other formula funding, this section authorizes $231,569,734 in direct funding for the Department of Education to make allocations to Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, and Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institutions. Section 2003 specifies that the Department must use:
 $142,504,452 for Tribal Colleges and Universities;
 $71,252,226 for Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions; and
 $17,813,056 for Native American Serving Non-Tribal Institutions.
This funding will remain available from FY2021-FY2023.
SEC. 2201 – CHILD CARE & DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM & SEC. 2202 – CHILD CARE STABLIZATION ($1,072,000,000)
These sections authorize a minimum of $1,072,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to support Tribes and Tribal organizations that participate in the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) program. This funding will remain available until the end of FY2024.
SEC. 2203 – HEAD START ($25,401,000)
These sections authorize a minimum of $25,401,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to support Tribes and Tribal organizations that participate in the Head Start programs. This funding will remain available until the end of FY2022.
SEC. 2204 – PROGRAMS FOR SURVIVORS ($19,000,000)
This section authorizes $19,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to support the Stronghearts Native Helpline and Tribal Family Violence Prevention and Services Act (FVPSA) grantees. Section 2204 specifies that the Department must use:
 $1,000,000 for the Stronghearts Native Helpline; and
 $18,000,000 for Tribal FVPSA grantees.
These funds will remain available until expended.

SEC. 2205 – CHILD ABUSE PREVENTION & TREATMENT ($2,500,000)
This section authorizes $2,500,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to provide supplemental assistance to Tribal community-based child abuse prevention grantees that receive support under the Child Abuse Prevention and Treatment Act communitybased grant program. These funds will remain available until the end of FY2023.
SEC. 2601 – FUNDING FOR COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTERS & COMMUNITY CARE ($20,000,000)
This section authorizes $20,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to provide additional support to Papa Ola Lokahi and Native Hawaiian Health Care Centers. This funding will remain available until expended.
SEC. 2911 – FUNDING FOR LIHEAP (TBD)
This section authorizes $4,500,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Services to provide supplemental funding for Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Act program (LIHEAP) participants. Tribal LIHEAP participants will receive a portion of this supplemental assistance. These funds will be available through the end of FY2022.
SEC. 2912 – FUNDING FOR WATER ASSISTANCE PROGRAM $15,000,000)
This section authorizes a minimum of $15,000,000 for the Department of Health and Human Services to support Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations that assist low-income households that pay a high proportion of household income for drinking water and wastewater services. These funds will remain available until expended.
SEC. 2921 – SUPPORTING OLDER AMERICANS & THEIR FAMILIES ($25,000,000)
This section authorizes $25,000,000 for the Department of Health and Human Services to provide supplementary assistance for Native organizations that provide supportive services for Native elders. These funds will remain available until expended.
TITLE III – COMMITTEE ON BANKING, HOUSING, & URBAN AFFAIRS ($1,033,000,000)
SEC. 3206 – HOMEOWNER ASSISTANCE FUND ($498,000,000)
This section authorizes $498,000,000 for the Department of the Treasury to provide assistance under the newly established Homeowner Assistance Fund program for Tribes, Tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs), and the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands. It specifies that—
 These funds may be spent for the purposes of preventing homeowner mortgage delinquencies, defaults, foreclosures, utilities assistance, and prevention of the displacement of homeowners experiencing financial hardship associated with the COVID-19 pandemic;
 No less than 60% of entity allocations from this fund must be used to assist homeowners who have incomes equal to or less than 100% of the area median income or the national median
income, whichever is greater; and  Tribes that do not participate in the Indian Housing Block Grant must “opt in” no later than 30 days after enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act in order to participate the Homeowners Assistance program.
 The Department must allocate the funds using the same formula developed for the
CRRSA/Coronabus Emergency Rental Assistance program.
 The Department must begin making payments to Tribes, TDHEs, and the Department of
Hawaiian Homelands no later than 45 days after ARPA enactment.
These funds will remain available until the end of FY2025.
SEC. 3301 – STATE SMALL BUSINESS CREDIT INITIATIVE ($500,000,000)
This section reauthorizes the Department of the Treasury’s State Small Business Credit Initiative and makes Tribal governments eligible to participate for the first time. It requires the Department to allocate $500,000,000 among Tribal governments within 60 days of enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act in an amount determined by the Department based on employment and economic data. It allows the Department to require Tribal governments interested in participating in the
program, either individually or jointly with other Tribes, to file a notice of intent with the Department no later than 30 days after enactment. It defines “Tribal governments” as the
recognized governing body of any federally recognized Tribe identified on the Department of the Interior’s Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act list.
SEC. 3401 – FEDERAL TRANSIT ADMINISTRATION GRANTS ($35,000,000)
This section authorizes $35,000,000 in direct funding for the Federal Transit Administration (FTA) to support Tribal transit agencies impacted by the COVID-19 pandemic. These funds will
remain available until the end of FY2024, and the FTA must allocate $30,000,000 through the Rural Areas formula grants and $5,000,000 through discretionary grants.
TITLE IX – COMMITTEE ON FINANCE ($21,229,850,000)
SEC. 9201 – PANDEMIC EMERGENCY ASSISTANCE ($74,850,000)
This section authorizes up to $74,850,000 in direct funding through the newly established Pandemic Emergency Assistance program for Tribes and Tribal organizations that participate in
the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families program at the Department of Health and Human Services. These funds will remain available until expended.
SEC. 9801 – CHILD CARE ASSISTANCE ($400,000,000)
This section increases the annual mandatory funding for Indian Tribes and Tribal organizations under the Child Care Entitlement program by approximately $40,000,000 per year.
SEC. 9815 – EXTENSION OF 100 PERCENT FEDERAL MEDICAL ASSISTANCE PERCENTAGE TO URBAN INDIAN HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS & NATIVE HAWAIIAN HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS ($155,000,000)
This section makes Urban Indian Organizations that operate under contract with the Indian Health Service and Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems eligible to receive 100% reimbursement from the federal government for Medicaid services for two years. This eligibility gives Urban Indian
Organizations and Native Hawaiian Health Care Systems parity with federally-operated and Tribally-operated Indian Health Service facilities.
SEC. 9901 – CORONAVIRUS STATE AND LOCAL FISCAL RECOVERY FUNDS ($20,600,000,000)
This section authorizes $20,600,000,000 in direct funding through various Coronavirus Recovery Funds established at the Department of the Treasury for Tribal governments.
 The Coronavirus State Fiscal Recovery Fund authorizes $20,000,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of the Treasury to make payments to Tribal governments within 60 days of enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act. It defines “Tribal governments” as the recognized governing body of any federally recognized Tribe identified on the Department of
the Interior’s Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act list. These funds will remain available through December 31, 2024.
The Department must allocate $1,000,000,000 of these funds equally among all Tribal governments, but it will determine the method for allocating the remaining $19,000,000,000.
Tribal governments must submit periodic reports to the Department detailing how it is using payments under this section. They may only use these funds to—
o Respond to the COVID-19 pandemic and its negative economic impacts;
o Provide premium pay to essential workers;
o Replace COVID-19-related lost revenues necessary to support the provision of government services; and
o Make necessary investments in water, sewer, and broadband infrastructure.
Improperly spent funds are subject to recoupment.
 The newly established Coronavirus Capital Projects Fund authorizes $100,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of the Treasury to make equal payments of no less than $50,000 to
each Tribal government and the State of Hawaii to carry out critical capital projects in response to the COVID-19 pandemic. It defines a “Tribal government” as the recognized governing body of any federally recognized Tribe identified on the Department of the Interior’s Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act list and requires the State of Hawaii to use any funds it receives exclusively for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands and Native Hawaiian Education Programs. It further requires the Department to make these payments no
later than 60 days after enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act. The funds will remain available until expended.
 The newly established Local Assistance and Tribal Consistency Fund authorizes $500,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of the Treasury to make payments to Tribal governments for any governmental activity (aside from lobbying). It defines a “Tribal government” as the recognized governing body of any federally recognized Tribe identified on the Department of the Interior’s Federally Recognized Indian Tribe List Act list. These funds will be distributed over two fiscal years and will remain available until the end of FY2023.
TITLE XI – COMMITTEE ON INDIAN AFFAIRS ($8,804,000,000)
SEC. 11001 – INDIAN HEALTH SERVICE ($6,094,000,000)
This section authorizes $6,094,000,000 in direct funding for the Indian Health Service to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on operation of essential health and sanitation programs. It specifies that the Indian Health Service must use—
 $2,340,000,000 for expenses related to—
o COVID-19 vaccine campaigns,
o COVID-19 testing, tracing, and mitigation, and
o expanding or sustaining a public health workforce;
 $2,000,000,000 for lost third party medical billing reimbursements (e.g., private insurance, Medicaid, Medicare) to ensure federally-operated IHS facilities, Tribally-operated IHS
facilities, and urban Indian health facilities can continue operations despite COVID-19-related estimated budget shortfalls;
 $600,000,000 for construction, maintenance, and improvement of IHS facilities and sanitation
systems in American Indian and Alaska Native homes;
 $500,000,000 for clinical health services and Purchased/Referred Care;
 $420,000,000 for expenses related to mental and behavioral health prevention services, treatment services, IT improvement, telehealth expansion, and facilities construction or improvement;
 $140,000,000 for improving health IT and telehealth access;
 $84,000,000 for awards to urban Indian health centers; and
 $10,000,000 for potable water delivery.
These funds will remain available until expended.
SEC. 11002 – BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS ($900,000,000)
This section authorizes $900,000,000 in direct funding for the Bureau of Indian Affairs to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on operation of its essential social welfare and public safety programs. These funds will remain available until expended. This section specifies that the Bureau must use—
 $772,500,000 for Tribal government services (i.e., assistance to Tribal governments, public safety, and child welfare programs);
 $100,000,000 for the Bureau’s Housing Improvement Program;
 $20,000,000 for potable water delivery; and
 $7,500,000 for administrative costs and oversight.
The section prohibits the Department from counting assistance provided to Tribes with these funds for purposes of determining eligibility for the “Small and Needy” Tribes program.
These funds will remain available until expended.
SEC. 11003 – HOUSING ASSISTANCE AND SUPPORTIVE SERVICES PROGRAMS FOR NATIVE AMERICANS ($750,000,000)
This section authorizes $750,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Office of Native American Programs to address the impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on operation of its Native American housing and community development programs. It specifies that the Department must use—
 $450,000,000 for the Indian Housing Block Grant program;
 $280,000,000 for the Indian Community Development Block Grant program;
 $10,000,000 for technical assistance;
 $5,000,000 for the Native Hawaiian Housing Block Grant program; and
 $5,000,000 for administrative costs and oversight.
The Department may waive or alter regulations as necessary to assist in the expedited administration of these funds. Recipients may use these funds for eligible COVID-19-related expenses incurred since January 21, 2020.
These funds will remain available until the end of FY2025.
SEC. 11004 – COVID19 RESPONSE RESOURCES FOR THE PRESERVATION AND MAINTENANCE OF NATIVE AMERICAN LANGUAGES ($20,000,000)
This section amends the Native American Programs Act to authorize $20,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Health and Human Service’s Administration for Native Americans to issue emergency Native American language preservation and maintenance grants to Native
American language communities to mitigate COVID-19 related disruptions or threats to the survival and continued vitality of their mother tongues.
The Department must establish a method to award these grants within 180 days of enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act. Eligibility for these new grants is limited to entities eligible to
receive other language grants from the Administration for Native Americans.
Funds for these grants will remain available until expended.
SEC. 11005 – BUREAU OF INDIAN EDUCATION ($850,000,000)
This section authorizes $850,000,000 in direct funding for the Bureau of Indian Education for Bureau-related programs and activities and to provide assistance to Bureau-funded schools and Tribal colleges and universities. It specifies that the BIE Director must determine the allocation of these funds within 45 days of enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act and that these funds will remain available until expended.
SEC. 11006 – AMERICAN INDIAN, NATIVE HAWAIIAN, AND ALASKA NATIVE EDUCATION ($190,000,000)
This section authorizes $190,000,000 in direct funding for the Department of Education to support Tribal education agencies, Native Hawaiian education organizations, and Alaska Native education organizations eligible for funding under Title VI of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act.
These funds will remain available until expended, but the Department must allocate them within 180 days of enactment of the American Rescue Plan Act. This section also specifies that the Department must use—
 $85,000,000 for grants to Native Hawaiian education organizations;
 $85,000,000 for grants to Alaska Native education organizations; and
 $20,000,000 for grants to Tribal education agencies.


Table: Dedicated Funding for Tribes & Native Communities in the American Rescue Plan Act Dedicated Funding for Tribes & Native Communities by Title
American Rescue Plan Act Total Dedicated Funding $32,459,020,734
Title I – Agriculture, Nutrition, & Forestry $ 20,200,000
Sec.1006 $ 20,200,000
Title II – Health, Education, Labor, & Pensions $ 1,410,470,734
Sec.2003 $ 231,569,734
Sec.2201 $ 412,000,000
Sec.2202 $ 659,000,000
Sec.2203 $ 25,401,000
Sec.2204 $ 19,000,000
Sec.2205 $ 2,500,000
Sec.2601 $ 20,000,000
Sec.2911 (TBD)
Sec.2912 $ 15,000,000
Sec.2921 $ 25,000,000
Title III – Banking, Housing, & Urban Affairs $ 1,033,000,000
Sec.3206 $ 498,000,000
Sec.3301 $ 500,000,000
Sec.3401 $ 35,000,000
Title IX – Finance $ 21,229,850,000
Sec.9201 $ 74,850,000
Sec.9801 $ 400,000,000
Sec.9815 $ 155,000,000
Sec.9901 $ 20,600,000,000
Title XI – Indian Affairs $ 8,804,000,000
Sec.11001 $ 6,094,000,000
Sec.11002 $ 900,000,000
Sec.11003 $ 750,000,000
Sec.11004 $ 20,000,000
Sec.11005 $ 850,000,000
Sec.11006 $ 190,000,000

To view the FAQs (https://www.indian.senate.gov/sites/default/files/2021-03-15%20FAQs%20ARPA%20-%20SCIA%20%28FINAL%29.pdf}

American Rescue Plan Act
Frequently Asked Questions
Sec. 11001 – Indian Health Service (IHS)
How will the $6,094,000,000 in ARPA IHS sec. 11001 funding be allocated?
The ARPA requires IHS to divide the $6,094,000,000 provided in Sec. 11001 among the following activities:
 $2,340,000,000 for COVID-19 related expenses (e.g., vaccination campaigns, testing, mitigation, supplies, and sustaining/expanding a public health workforce);
 $2,000,000,000 for lost third party billing reimbursements to offset budget shortfalls;
 $600,000,000 for construction, maintenance, and sanitation projects;
 $420,000,000 for mental and behavioral health treatment and prevention services;
 $140,000,000 for health IT and telehealth;
 $84,000,000 for urban Indian health centers; and
 $10,000,000 for potable water delivery.
The ARPA provides broad flexibility in determining the allocation of funds within these seven categories to ensure Tribes and urban Indian health programs’ unique needs are addressed. The IHS has already announced a Tribal consultation on March 17th and an urban confer on March
15th to seek input on how to allocate funds within these seven categories.

How long will ARPA IHS Sec. 11001 funding remain available?
All ARPA IHS funds will remain available until expended.
Can the ARPA IHS funding in Sec. 11001 be used to cover retroactive eligible expenses my Tribal Health Program or Urban Indian Health Program have already incurred while
responding to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Yes. In addition to new expenses, ARPA IHS Sec. 11001 funds can be used to cover eligible COVID-19 related expenses incurred since January 31, 2020.

Does the IHS funding provide support to address my Tribe’s immediate sanitation and water infrastructure needs?
Yes. The ARPA specifies that IHS must use $600,000,000 to address construction, maintenance, and sanitation projects. The ARPA provides broad flexibility to determine the allocation of these funds among different infrastructure activities so that Tribes and urban Indian health programs’ unique needs are addressed. Interested Tribes should plan to participate in IHS’s ARPA consultation, which begins on March 17.

Which ARPA IHS Sec. 11001 funds are urban Indian health programs eligible for?
In addition to being eligible for $84,000,000 in direct funding, urban Indian health programs are also eligible under ARPA to receive funding from the other IHS categories. Interested urban
Indian health programs should plan to participate in IHS’s ARPA confer period, which begins on March 15

Sec. 11002 – Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA)
How will the $900,000,000 in ARPA BIA Sec. 11002 funding be allocated?
The ARPA requires BIA to divide the $900,000,000 provided in Sec. 11002 among the following activities:
 $100,000,000 for BIA’s Housing Improvement Program (HIP);
 $772,500,000 for Tribal government services, public safety/justice activities, social services, and child welfare services;
 $20,000,000 for provision and delivery of potable water;
 $7,500,000 for BIA administrative costs and oversight.
The ARPA provides broad flexibility in determining the allocation of funds within these four categories to ensure Tribes and Tribal organizations unique needs are addressed. Tribes should reach out to the BIA to inquire when the agency will schedule ARPA consultation sessions to seek input on allocation of funds within these four categories.

How long will ARPA BIA Sec. 11002 funding remain available?
All ARPA BIA funds will remain available until expended.

If my Tribe receives support through BIA’s “Small and Needy” program, will ARPA BIA Sec. 11002 funds impact our continued participation in the “Small and Needy” program?
No. ARPA BIA funds will be excluded from calculations used to determine participation in the “Small and Needy” program.

Sec. 11003 – Housing Assistance & Supportive Services Programs for Native Americans
How will the $750,000,000 in Native housing funding in Sec. 110003 be allocated?
The ARPA requires the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to divide the $750,000,000 provided in Sec. 11003 among the following activities:
 $450,000,000 for Tribes and Tribally designated housing entities (TDHEs) through the Native American Housing and Self Determination Act (NAHASDA) Title I Indian Housing Block Grant (IHBG) formula;
 $280,000,000 for Indian Community Development Block Grants (ICDBG);
 $10,000,000 for technical assistance;
 $5,000,000 for the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands through the NAHASDA Title VIII grant program; and
 $5,000,000 for administrative costs.

How long will ARPA Native housing funding in Sec. 110003 remain available?
All ARPA Native housing funds provided through Sec. 110003 will remain available until September 30, 2025.

Can ARPA Native housing Sec. 11003 funds be used to cover retroactive eligible expenses my Tribe or TDHE incurred while responding to the COVID-19 pandemic?
Yes. In addition to new expenses, ARPA Native housing Sec. 11003 funds can be used to cover eligible COVID-19 related expenses incurred since January 21, 2020.

Are the ARPA IHBG and ICDBG Sec. 11003 funds subject to the same statutory and regulatory limitations that apply to these programs generally?
No. The ARPA recognizes that Tribes need broader flexibility to access and use ARPA funds in a way that makes sense for their communities’ unique COVID-19 needs. The ARPA allows HUD to waive or alter any statutory or regulatory provisions related to IHBG and ICDBG necessary to expedite and facilitate the use of ARPA funds (except for requirements related to fair housing, nondiscrimination, labor standards, and the environment). Tribes should reach out to HUD to inquire how the agency will determine what ARPA waivers and alternative requirements will govern the use of these funds.

Which Tribes and TDHEs are eligible to receive ARPA IHBG funding?
The ARPA requires that HUD distribute IHBG funding to Tribes and TDHEs using its FY 2021 allocation formula, which provided funding to over 590 eligible entities.

Can Tribes that do not participate in IHBG receive ARPA IHBG funding?
Tribes that do not participate in the annual IHBG program are eligible to receive IHBG funding provided by Sec. 11003 unless they have proactively opted out of the program.

What happens if any of the $450,000,000 reserved for IHBG funds in Sec. 110003 is returned or recaptured?
Any ARPA IHBG funds returned or recaptured will be transferred for ARPA ICDBG use to ensure ARPA Native housing funds remain in Indian Country.

Can the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands use its ARPA Sec. 11003 funds to provide rental assistance to eligible Native Hawaiian families? And, if so, is the Department limited
to providing rental assistance only on Hawaiian Home Lands?
Yes, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands may use any portion of the $5,000,000 it receives under ARPA Sec. 11003 to provide rental assistance to eligible Native Hawaiian families.
Additionally, the Department of Hawaiian Home Lands may use these funds to provide rental assistance to eligible Native Hawaiian families on or off Hawaiian Home Lands.

Can my Tribe use ARPA ICDBG Sec. 11003 funds for its own planning and management expenses?
Yes. Tribes may use up to 20% of any ARPA ICDBG funds they receive for planning, management, and administration costs.

Can my Tribe use ARPA ICDBG Sec. 11003 funds for public services?
Yes. Tribes may use up to 100% of any ARPA ICDBG funds they receive for eligible public service activities related to their COVID-19 response (e.g., employment, public safety, child
care, public health, education, energy conservation services).

Will the $280,000,000 in ARPA ICDBG funds be competitive?
HUD has yet to determine whether it may use its waiver authority under the ARPA ICDBG provisions to allow funds to be awarded using the CARES ICDBG “first-come-first-served”.
Tribes interested in this matter should contact HUD. Sec. 11004 – COVID-19 Response Resources for the Preservation & Maintenance of Native American Languages

Who is eligible to receive an ARPA Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grant authorized under Sec. 11004?
Indian Tribes, Native Hawaiian organizations, Alaska Native organizations, Native American Pacific Islander organizations, and other agencies/organizations eligible to receive assistance
from the Administration for Native Americans (ANA) are eligible to receive an ARPA Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grant. The full list of entities eligible to receive ANA assistance can be found at 42 U.S.C. 2991b(a).

What is the process for receiving an ARPA Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grant authorized under Sec. 110004?
The ARPA provides broad flexibility to establish the new Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grant program, but requires the ANA to finalize the grant program parameters within 180 days of ARPA enactment (i.e., September 7, 2021). Native communities should reach out to the ANA to inquire about how the agency will determine what
parameters will govern this new grant.

Will ARPA Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grants require the same application materials as other ANA language grants?
No. The ARPA explicitly exempts the newly established Native Language COVID-19 Emergency Preservation and Maintenance grant program from the application requirements that apply to the ANA’s existing language grants.

Sec. 11005 – Bureau of Indian Education (BIE)
How will the $850,000,000 in ARPA BIE Sec. 11005 funding be allocated?
The ARPA provides broad flexibility to determine the allocation of BIE Sec. 11005 funds so that Tribes, Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs), Tribal BIE school leaders, and BIE and TCU
students and parents’ unique needs are addressed. However, the ARPA requires the BIE Director to establish the method for allocating these funds among administrative activities, BIE
K-12 schools and dormitories, and TCUs within 45 days of ARPA enactment (i.e., April 25, 2021). Anyone interested in weighing in on the method for allocating these funds should reach
out to the BIE to inquire when the agency will schedule ARPA consultation sessions.

How long will ARPA BIE Sec. 11005 funding remain available?
All ARPA BIE Sec. 11005 funds will remain available until expended.

What types of activities and costs can ARPA BIE Sec. 11005 funding be used for?
The ARPA recognizes that TCUs, BIE schools, and BIE dormitories need broad flexibility to use ARPA funds in a way that makes sense for their communities’ unique COVID-19 needs. For example, while some schools may need support for expanding broadband access, other schools may need funds to modernize ventilation systems or provide student and staff supportive services. Anyone interested in weighing in on the scope of allowable uses for these funds should reach out to the BIE to inquire when the agency will schedule ARPA consultation sessions.

Sec. 11006 – American Indian, Native Hawaiian, & Alaska Native Education
How will the $190,000,000 in ARPA Native education Sec. 11006 funding be allocated?
The ARPA requires the Department of Education to divide the $190,000,000 provided in Sec. 11006 as follows:
 $20,000,000 for Tribal education agencies;
 $85,000,000 for Native Hawaiian education organizations and entities; and
 $85,000,000 for Alaska Native education organizations and entities.
The ARPA provides broad flexibility to determine the allocation method of funds within these three categories to ensure Tribal education agencies and Native organizations’ unique needs are
addressed. However, the ARPA requires the Department to establish the method for allocating these three sets of funds within 180 days of ARPA enactment (i.e., September 7, 2021). Anyone interested in weighing in on the allocation of these funds should reach out to the Department with inquires and input.

How long will ARPA Native education Sec. 11006 funding remain available?
All ARPA Sec. 11006 funds will remain available until expended.

What can Tribal education agencies use ARPA Sec. 11006 funding for?
Tribal education agencies that receive ARPA Sec. 11006 funding may use these funds for any of the purposes identified in Elementary and Secondary Education Act section 6121(c) (20 U.S.C. 7441(c)). Examples of allowable activities include student guidance/counseling services, additional instruction opportunities, bilingual/bicultural programs, and student health and nutrition services.

Who is eligible to receive funds from the $85,000,000 reserved for Native Hawaiian education organizations and entities under ARPA Sec. 11006? Organizations and entities eligible to receive grants under Elementary and Secondary Education
Act Section 6205(a)(1) (20 U.S.C. 7515(a)(1)) are eligible for ARPA Sec. 11006 funds. This list includes:
 Native Hawaiian education organizations;
 Native Hawaiian community-based organizations;
 Public and private nonprofit organizations, agencies, and institutions with experience in developing or operating Native Hawaiian programs or programs of instruction in the Native Hawaiian language;
 Charter schools; and
 Consortia of any of the above.

What can Native Hawaiian education organizations and entities use ARPA Sec. 11006 funding for?
Native Hawaiian education organizations and entities that receive ARPA Sec. 11006 funding may use these funds for any of the purposes identified in Elementary and Secondary Education
Act section 6205(a)(3) (20 U.S.C. 7515(a)(3)). Examples of allowable activities include activities that enhance students’ Hawaiian and English language literacy, meet the special needs
of Native Hawaiian students with disabilities, support Native Hawaiian gifted and talented students, and provide professional development of educators.

Who is eligible to receive funds from the $85,000,000 reserved for Alaska Native education organizations and entities under ARPA Sec. 11006?
Organizations and entities eligible to receive grants under Elementary and Secondary Education Act Section 6304(a)(1) (20 U.S.C. 7544(a)(1)) are eligible for ARPA Sec. 11006 funds. This list
includes:
 Alaska Native organizations with experience operating education and related programs;
 Alaska Native organizations that partner with a state or local education agency or Alaska Native organizations with experience operating education and related programs; and
 An entity located in Alaska, predominately governed by Alaska Natives, that has experience operating education and related programs and is granted an official charter or
sanction (as described in the definition of “Tribal organization” under 25 U.S.C. 5304) from an Alaska Native Tribe or an Alaska Native organization.

What can Alaska Native education entities use ARPA Sec. 11006 funding for?
Alaska Native education organizations and entities that receive ARPA Sec. 11006 funding may use these funds for any of the purposes identified in Elementary and Secondary Education Act
section 6304(a)(2-3) (20 U.S.C. 7544(a)(2-3)). Examples of authorized activities include activities that improve the educational outcomes and school readiness of Alaska Natives, assist in the collection of data, develop curricula, provide professional development for educators, opportunities for student enrichment, and promote Alaska Native students’ academic progress.


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